Opinion

Robotization and the future of humanity

REUTERS/TINGSHU WANG- Robots humanoides desarrollados por EXRobots en la Conferencia Mundial de Robots de Pekín (WRC) 2023 en Pekín, China, 17 de agosto de 2023
photo_camera REUTERS/TINGSHU WANG- Humanoid robots developed by EXRobots at the World Robot Conference (WRC) 2023 in Beijing, China, August 17, 2023.

Robotization is the final form of capitalist degeneration of humanity. Capitalism does not transform robots into humans, but humans into robots. Instead of human evolution having a historical character, it takes on a technocratic character. Capitalism destroys man鈥檚 personality and reduces him to a functional component of technical processes through which capitalism destroys the human and living world. Marx's concept of 鈥渞eification鈥 (Verdinglichung) points to the prevailing tendency of world development. Capitalism abolishes man as a human and natural being and turns him into technical means for the development of capitalism. 

Robots are a projection of the capitalistically degenerated humanity. Capitalism abolishes interpersonal relationships and, in doing so, abolishes man as social being. Society becomes a crowd of atomized individuals reduced to a labor-consumer mass. People lose the need for human connection. Man no longer seeks humanity in another man, but in virtual worlds, pets and technological devices. Robots become a substitute for human beings. 

Measured by capitalist criteria, one of the most significant advantages of robots over humans is that robots, as technical "beings," can constantly be improved based on the productivist efficiency that has a profitable character. The rate of capital turnover is the driving force behind the robotization of humans and the technization of the world. In the end, the process of robotization comes down to the development of capitalism, which involves the increasingly intensive destruction of man as a human and life-creating being. Robotization indicates that there are no limits to the capitalist future. 

This is especially significant when it comes to the "conquest of space." The technocratic approach to space and to the cosmic future of humanity is conditioned by a dehumanized technocratic mind. Man is abolished as a historical being, and thereby as a unique and irreplaceable cosmic being. Rather than endeavoring to create a humane cosmos, man is instead, through technical means, abolished as a human and natural being and reduced to cosmic processes that have an energetic and mechanical character.

Robots are an organic part of the technical world, and their characteristics are conditioned by the nature of capitalism. They are mass-produced and, as such, disposable commodities. Robots are not social or historical beings; they lack emotions, mind, libertarian dignity, cultural and national self-awareness, moral criteria, rights, they don't get sick, they work 24 hours a day as programmed, they are replaceable, and can be instantly turned off and destroyed... 

Capitalists do not strive to create robots that are increasingly similar to humans in their qualities but rather humans who are increasingly similar to robots. Humans are not the role models for robots; robots are the role models for humans. Through the spectacular model of robots, capitalist propaganda machinery imposes on people the image of the capitalist man of the future. In reality, robots are surrogates of humans turned by capitalism into ideal slaves. 

Sport is an area where the robotization of humans in the existing world has reached its highest level. The human body has become a technical means to achieve records, and the "quest for records" is based on a productivistic fanaticism with a technical and destructive character. This is what defines the personality of an athlete, as well as their relation to the world and the future. 

Considering that capitalism is increasingly destroying the living conditions in which man as a natural and human being can survive, the distinctive ability of robots to function in environments that are deadly to humans becomes of paramount importance. The destruction of the living environment devalues man as a human and natural being and further encourages the process of robotization

Robotization suggests that capitalism can survive without humans. In the capitalistically degenerated world, humanity is not just superfluous; it has become an impediment to "progress." With the development of consumer society, which means capitalism鈥檚 becoming a totalitarian order of destruction, capitalism has come to the final reckoning with the living world and with man as a human and natural being. Man has become an "obsolete being" that is to conclude his cosmic odyssey in the capitalist landfill.

Translated  from  Serbian  by  Igor Barjaktarevi膰